Athletes on Steroids, PED’s, and more UFC black eyes by Jon Jones

Professor Vandry's View

Photo: Jon Jones Instagram photo showing alleged training, to the viewer it implies PED effects.

Jon Jones is becoming the UFC’s version of Affliction and Josh Barnett.

Affliction: Trilogy was to feature a fight between Fedor Emelianenko and Josh Barnett as its headline event at the Honda Center in Anaheim, California on August 1, 2009. On July 22, 11 days before the scheduled event, the California State Athletic Commission announced it would not license Barnett because he tested positive for a banned substance. Later that day, the CSAC issued a press release which stated that anabolic steroids were the substance detected in Barnett’s drug test. That was the end of Affliction.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affliction_Entertainment

Is this where the UFC is heading?

Having constant controversy, including the steroid issue or PED’s.

Remember the corrupt advantage famous athletes had on PED’s:

  • September 27, 1988: Ben Johnson is stripped of his Olympic gold medal after failing drug tests.
  • 2011 Barry Bonds admitted using steroids during his baseball career.

Photo: Serena Williams and Barry Bonds physical change over career

Is Serena Williams on Steroids?

 https://vascularcme.com/2017/01/29/is-serena-williams-on-steroids-best-answer-so-far/

Serena has faced allegations of drug use throughout her career and for good reason. It was alleged that she managed to evade drug testers (for OC) entirely for two years in 2010 and 2011. Serena’s actions include:

  • She covered up failed ICs by citing phantom injuries.
  • She also famously locked herself in a panic room and called 911 when an out-of-competition tester called on her in October 2011. She never provided a sample afterwards and the tennis authorities did not answer why.

  • Serena was one of the players (including Venus Williams, Jennifer Capriati and Lindsey Davenport) who protested against the WTA’s new drug testing rules in 2000 which led to the cancellation of WTA’s off-season testing program too.
  • She has protested vociferously against any attempts made by the WTA/ITF to make testing more rigorous and stringent.
  • She once reportedly declared that “women don’t need to be tested because women don’t take steroids”.
  • She also raised similar objections before the 2004 Olympics in Athens until the WTA gave in.
  • However,the IOC did not and Williams ended up withdrawing from the games citing “terrorism fears” in Greece!

A stronger and more incriminating pointer was the pulmonary embolism and hematoma that Williams suffered in March 2011. Since embolisms and DVT (Deep Vein Thrombosis) are often associated with sedentary lifestyles, it is surprising when healthy athletes develop the condition. However, it is not rare and there is enough evidence to suggest a link between anabolic steroid use and embolisms in athletes. In fact, anabolic steroid use is one of the biggest risk factors for the condition. Some body builders will also agree that hematomas often occur while injecting steroids.

http://www.kon.org/urc/v12/thompson.html

One could look up Serena on http://tennishasasteroidproblem.blogspot.com/ (an insider, whistle-blower blog) for more comprehensive data and analysis on this question.

September 14, 2016 Williams sisters, other US athletes let off by WADA despite positive dope test?

https://www.rediff.com/sports/report/williams-sisters-let-off-by-wada-despite-positive-dope-test-biles-pix/20160913.htm

Claiming to have accessed WADA’s database, a Russian hack team, known as Fancy Bear, said they have leaked dozens of files allegedly relating to United States athletes on the internet, according to media reports.

According to the Fancy Bears, Serena was allowed to take banned substances such as oxycodone, hydromorphone, prednisone and methylprednisolone in 2010, 2014 and 2015. Venus was allowed to take prednisone, prednisolone and triamcinolone among others in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

October 1, 2016: A couple of news outlets have reported that Serena told CNN that she plans to take a break from tennis as she is “tired of playing tournaments unhealthy”. This was in spite of playing only 8 tournaments this year.

Serena’s announcement came right after the Fancy Bears leak and more importantly recent ITF ruling that they’re going to do away with “silent bans” in order to salvage their reputation from further damage.

http://www.itftennis.com/news/237425.aspx

Obviously, this means that players who have been covering up bans with phantom injuries (like Serena?) may not be able to do so any longer.

https://fancybear.net/image/USA/Serena%20Williams/1.png

UFC steroids

Chael Sonnen on drug-test failures: ‘I’m not going to apologize because I’m not sorry’

Chael Sonnen, Stephen Bonnar, Vitor Belfort, Forrest Griffin, James Irvin, Nate Marquardt and Chris Leben have all tried to gain an unfair advantage fighting in the UFC.

Anderson Silva tested positive for drostanolone metabolites and androstane ahead of his win over Nick Diaz in the UFC 183 main event. Diaz, himself, tested positive for marijuana metabolites in a fight-night drug test.

Silva tested positive for androsterone and drostanolone metabolites. Dana White back then opined about drug testing, and blamed it on UFC legal team:

“Our legal team completely screwed that thing up,” White said. ” … We have no business doing drug testing. We f-cked it up, and we will f-ck it up again. That’s what the commission is there to do.”

Georges St-Pierre, told a group of Canadian reporters that one of the reasons he left was to protest the UFC’s attitude on drug testing.

“It’s one of the reasons why I stopped,” St-Pierre told RDS.ca. “Not really to [teach] them a lesson, because it penalizes me, too. But I wanted to do something for the sport that I love. I see the direction in which it goes, and I think it makes no sense. This is stupid.”

Evidence points to that direction. Jonny Hendricks, was 12-3 in the UFCO in the pre-USADA era. However, Hendricks went 1-5 over his next six contests after the USADA program began, and at one point missed weight three times over a four-fight span. Hendricks lost a bare knuckle bout by second round KO in 2018, and is now retired.

Photo: Jonny Hendricks physical change after drug testing standards raised

Former UFC fighter (Now at Bellator) Chael Sonnen had failed an initial drug test administered by the NAC on while Sonnen was in Las Vegas for UFC 173. Sonnen had traces of banned substances anastrozole and clomiphene in his system.

A day later, Sonnen announced his retirement on UFC Tonight and said that he was using the drugs as an alternative to testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), which was banned in Nevada in February. Sonnen said he has low testosterone and he and his wife were having fertility issues. The drugs, he said, alleviated those and now Brittany Sonnen is pregnant.

Competitive athletes take performance enhancing substances. Some do not. They are an unfair, cheating advantage in my opinion. You may be surprised to find that Brian Ortega who recently lost to Max Holloway, was also guilty of using PED’s:

2014 UFC rookie Brian Ortega has tested positive for the anabolic steroid drostanolone following his UFC on FOX 12 win over Mike de la Torre.

According to Sherdog.com, Ortega, a former RFA featherweight champion, was suspended for nine months and fined $2,500. Also, his first-round submission win over de la Torre has been changed to a no contest. California State Athletic Commission executive director Andy Foster confirmed the news with MMAFighting.com. Ortega has 30 days to appeal the punishment.

The same report states that Ortega, a Gracie Jiu-Jitsu black belt, was the only fighter on the card to fail his pre-fight urine test, which was administered by a World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) accredited lab in California.

Brian Ortega’s physical change from his first UFC:

The UFC has fined light heavyweight champion Jon Jones $25,000 for violating its Athlete Code of Conduct policy.

The King of UFC PR damage, Jon Jones

Possibly the most damaging UFC fighter to the UFC, Jon Jones has expressed his attitude, unprofessional behavior, and destruction to UFC promo. His patterns in history speak for themselves:

 January 2009 – Jones is cited for “unsafe passing” while driving with his girlfriend and young child in Ithaca, N.Y. Jones’ vehicle allegedly struck a car attempting to make a left turn. There were no injuries and he was not deemed to be at fault for the minor accident.

Nov. 24, 2011 – Jones is cited for “loss of traction” while pulling into an Albuquerque strip club. The Bentley Jones was driving was towed and Jones was taken into custody once officers on the scene learn Jones was driving on a suspended license. Charges were eventually dropped.

May 19, 2012 – Jones is involved in a minor accident when he crashes his Bentley into a utility pole in Binghamton, N.Y., after a night of partying. His two female passengers suffer minor injuries. Jones is uninjured. He gets taken into custody after refusing to take a sobriety test. Two months later he is issued a $1,000 fine and his driver’s license is suspended six months. He is also required to complete a victim-impact panel and have ignition interlocks installed on his vehicles.

Aug. 23, 2012 – The UFC announces UFC 151, a pay-per-view event scheduled for Sept. 1, is cancelled after Jones refuses to fight Chael Sonnen on short notice after Jones’ original opponent, Dan Henderson, withdraws with an injury. It’s the first time in UFC history that the promotion cancels an event. Jones receives the bulk of the blame.

Aug. 4, 2014 – Jones brawls with Daniel Cormier at a UFC 178 press event in a Las Vegas hotel.

Sept. 23, 2014 – Jones is fined $50,000 by the Nevada State Athletic Commission (NSAC) and handed 40 hours of community service in Las Vegas for his role in the Cormier brawl.

December 4, 2014 – Jones tested positive for cocaine during an out-of-competition drug test conducted by the Nevada Athletic Commission. The $25,000 will be donated to a substance abuse prevention program.

Jones’ testosterone-to-epitestosterone (T/E) ratio and total testosterone level leading up to his triumph over Daniel Cormier. Jones had his T/E levels measured on three occasions — an extra test was ordered because his first sample was diluted — as part of out-of-competition drug testing ordered by the NAC. His ratio in the three tests were 0.29:1, 0.35:1 and 0.19:1, well below the normal ratio (1.3:1) for an average African-American male, according to Conte.

In addition, Jones’ testosterone levels in those three tests were 1.8 ng/mL, 0.59 ng/mL and 4.9 ng/mL; the average level for a male is 61.3 ng/ML

The UFC confirmed with the Nevada Athletic Commission that Jones passed all required drug tests following UFC 182. Jones was allowed to fight because cocaine is not a banned out-of-competition substance under World Anti-Doping Agency rules.

Jon Jones’ cocaine revelation shows contradictions in UFC drug policy. Jones, spent one night in a rehab facility.

Jan. 3, 2015 Jones wins his grudge match with Cormier in the main event of UFC 182 via unanimous decision.

Jan. 6, 2015 – Jones checks into a rehab facility after it’s revealed he tested positive for cocaine metabolites during an out-of-competition drug screening prior to UFC 182.

Jan. 17, 2015 – The UFC fines Jones $25,000 for violating its Athlete Code of Conduct policy for the failed drug test.

April 26, 2015  A felony arrest warrant was issued for Jones’ involvement in a hit-and-run accident that left a pregnant woman — now identified as Vanessa Sonnenberg — with a broken arm and wrist. According to the Albuquerque Police Department report, Jones allegedly ran a red light and crashed into Sonnenberg’s car and fled the scene of the accident.  Witnesses said he ran back to grab cash from the car before running away.  An off duty officer identified Jones.  Paperwork belonging to Jones was found in the 2015 silver Buick SUV, as was a marijuana pipe with marijuana inside of.

April 27, 2015 – Jones turns himself in to Albuquerque police after a hit-and-run incident that leaves a pregnant women injured. Jones fled from the scene and marijuana was found in his vehicle.

April 28, 2015 – Jones is stripped of his UFC title and suspended indefinitely by the promotion.

Sept. 29, 2015 – Jones pleads guilty to a charge of leaving the scene of an accident involving injury. He avoids jail time but is required to serve up to 18 months of supervised probation.

Oct. 23, 2015 – The UFC reinstates Jones after the company’s lawyers review the fighter’s plea agreement.

March 29, 2016 – Jones is booked into county jail in Albuquerque for violating his probation. The week prior he was accused of drag racing and given five citations.

March 31, 2016 – Jones is ordered to take anger management and driver improvement classes for violating his probation.

July 6, 2016 – Jones is flagged by the USADA for a potential doping violation and is pulled from his UFC 200 main event bout with Cormier.

Nov. 7, 2016 – Jones is issued a one-year ban from USADA retroactive to the July 6 test he failed. The decision was rendered one week after a lengthy evidentiary hearing. Jones initially was facing a two-year suspension.

Nov. 9, 2016 – Jones is stripped of his interim title by the UFC. In an interview with ESPN, UFC president Dana White called Jones the “greatest talent ever and the biggest screw-up ever.”

Dec. 15, 2016 – The NSAC officially announces Jones received a one-year suspension retroactive to the July 6 test, mirroring the punishment doled out by USADA.

July 29, 2017 – Jones defeats Cormier by third-round knockout in the main event of UFC 214 in Anaheim, Calif.

Aug. 22, 2017 – Jones is flagged by USADA and notified of a potential violation of the UFC’s anti-doping policy stemming from a July 28 drug screening following the UFC 214 weigh-ins. The anabolic androgenic steroid Turinabol was found in his system but Jones’s manager declares they want to have the samples tested again.

Sept. 12, 2017– USADA confirms the “B” sample from his failed UFC 214 test matched the “A” sample findings.

Sept. 13, 2017– The California State Athletic Commission decides to overturn Jones’s UFC 214 win over Cormier and change it to a no-contest. Later in the day the UFC announces it has stripped Jones of his title and reinstates Cormier as 205-pound champion.

December 2018  A drug test found a trace amount of Chlorodehydromethyltestosterone (DHCMT), or turinabol, in Jones’ system. That’s the same substance Jones tested positive for in 2017 that led to the 15-month suspension he recently was cleared from in order to fight this week.

December 19, 2018  Jon Jones skips recommended VADA testing ahead of UFC 232.

Has Jones been using PED’s his career? Would Jones have won all his fights without PED’s?

When you look at Hendricks and others, I doubt it. Jones has gifts with height, reach, wrestling and striking, but can they win without cheating? December 29 Jones will fight in a rematch with Gustafsson. Many feel Gus won the first fight. I did too. Since the event now has been moved from Las Vegas to California due to Jones’ drug testing, the fans are the biggest losers. Who pays for the flights, hotels, travel many went to Las Vegas for? It doesn’t matter whether Jones wins or not, he already lost the drug tests, now let’s see how this can be covered by the UFC.

Update: March 1, 2019 – A metabolite for the oral turinabol steroid continues to pulse in Jon Jones’ system prior to his fight with Anthony Smith at UFC 235.

From bloodyelbow.com:

A quintet of drug test results released today by the Nevada State Athletic Commission show the UFC light heavyweight passed three and failed two for the M3 metabolite that’s periodically been in his system since a positive test in July 2017.

Samples tested at the WADA-accredited Sports Medicine and Research Laboratory (SMRTL) on Feb. 14 and Feb. 15 returned “adverse” findings, with Jones respectively registering 40 and 20 picograms per milliliter. (See the NSAC’s statement and test findings here.)

One USADA test from Feb. 23 is still is pending. The NSAC has ordered that all of Jones’ pre-fight samples are to be expedited, but has cleared him to compete Saturday at the pay-per-view event at T-Mobile Arena.

As with previous findings where trace amounts of the steroid metabolite have shown up in Jones’ system, he is not being sanctioned because the metabolites are considered residual from the 2017 test that resulted in a 15-month suspension.

In a statement released to the media, the NSAC said Jones was “cooperative” and said SMRTL chief Daniel Eichner reaffirmed there is “no scientific or medical evidence that the athlete would have an unfair advantage leading up to, or for, his contest.”

The levels of M3 metabolite are approximately within the same range as previous tests where Jones has been flagged by drug tests; a positive from Dec. 28, 2018, returned a level of 33 picograms, while a Dec. 9 test was between 60 and 80 picograms.

The full test results and agency that conducted the test include:

  • Feb. 1 (U.S. Anti-Doping Agency) – No adverse analytical findings.
  • Feb. 9 (Voluntary Anti-Doping Association, in California) – No adverse analytical findings.
  • Feb. 14 (Nevada State Athletic Commission) – Adverse Analytical finding. DHCMT M3 detected 40 pg/mL.
  • Feb. 15 (Nevada State Athletic Commission) – Adverse Analytical finding. DHCMT M3 detected 20 pg/mL.
  • Feb. 18 (Voluntary Anti-Doping Association, in Nevada) – No adverse analytical findings.
  • Feb. 23 (U.S. Anti-Doping Agency) – Pending.

Jones previously has passed other drug tests, including one conducted Feb. 18 by VADA, in which the champ was ordered to enroll after his Dec. 9 test was the catalyst for moving his UFC 232 title fight from Nevada to California.

Who is doing the testing?

Jones had his samples analyzed by the Sports Medicine and Research Laboratory (SMRTL), which is located in Salt Lake City, Utah, and accredited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

Here’s the breakdown of Jones’ most recent tests:

Feb. 1: No adverse analytical findings (USADA)
Feb. 9: No adverse analytical findings (VADA Calif.)
Feb. 14: Adverse analytical finding: DHCMT M3 detected 40 pg/mL (NSAC)
Feb. 15: Adverse analytical finding: DHCMT M3 detected 20 pg/mL (NSAC)
Feb. 18: No adverse analytical findings (VADA Nev.)
Feb. 23: Results pending (USADA)

“Dr. Daniel Eichner, President and Laboratory Director of SMRTL, reviewed the above investigative reports and determined that they show no evidence that dehydrocholormethyltestosterone (DHCMT) has been re-administered,” NSAC wrote in today’s Email. “Dr. Eichner further provided that there is no scientific or medical evidence that the athlete (Jones) would have an unfair advantage leading up to, or for, his contest scheduled on March 2, 2019.”

Remember Jones’ defense that rested on Dr. Paul Scott of Korva Labs? Dr. Scott alos indicated he got his information from Jones’ attorney Howard Jacobs sourcing it from a bodybuilding website:

Source: SBN MMA

Here are some of Jones’ tests and amount of illegal performance enhancing substances:

  • Dec. 9, 2018 test 60-80 picograms
  • Dec. 28, 2018 test 33 picograms
  • Feb. 14: Adverse analytical finding: 40 pg/mL (NSAC)
  • Feb. 15: Adverse analytical finding: 20 pg/mL (NSAC)

It’s incredible how when Turinabol is in your body for close to two years, it mysteriously jumps from 60-80, picograms, to 33, back up to 40, then a day later down to 20. Must be those protein shakes!

Two detected traces of the M3 metabolite were found in five of the tests. Yet President of Sports Medicine and Research Laboratory  Dr Daniel Eichner said the recent failed tests showed “no evidence” that the banned substance has been re-administered.

Well, doesn’t that make us feel secure and trustworthy? The UFC has been losing a PPV audience for two years, although they make their income on events and videogames, etc. I wonder if this PPV Jones vs. Smith will even hit 250,00 orders?

Update: July 22, 2019 UFC champ Jon Jones charged with battery for alleged incident at strip club

A cocktail waitress, who worked at TD’s Eubank Showclub in Albuquerque called police to her home and alleged that Jones “slapped her inappropriately” and “pulled her down to his lap and kissed her neck,” per the report. Jones also allegedly placed the waitress in a chokehold and lifted her off the ground, she told police.

Jones failed to appear at a bond arraignment at Albuquerque Metropolitan Court on June 11, according to online court records. A bench warrant was issued against him the following day.

The court attempted to send Jones a letter later that month, but it bounced back June 24, per online records.

Jones paid the $300 cash bond Sunday at the Metropolitan Court, per the KRQE News 13 report.

Source: https://www.bloodyelbow.com/2019/7/22/20703391/jon-jones-charged-with-battery-for-april-incident-at-strip-club-ufc-light-heavyweight-mma-news

William Vandry

6th degree BB, BJJ

CSMT, CSIS, CSN, CPSI

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