William Vandry BJJ 2nd qtr VBJJ seminar, new ranks

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July 8, 2017

The second quarter seminar for VBJJ students was an all day event, with new ranks, celebrating and awesome techniques!

Techniques

Developing the butterfly guard for all ranks began with a guard transfer to butterfly, then to elevator sweeps to shin and X guard variations to sweep, to the William Vandry patented Zapruder leglock submission!

New awards to belts:

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Purple belts:

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Jim Nagle

Mark Kanda (Not in attendance)

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Dani Taki

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Chandra Vandry

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Patrick Storer

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Will Jackson

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Markus Lagmanson

Vandry’s first second degree BB award

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Jesus Armas, a long time student under William Vandry from Brownsville, Texas was awarded his second degree black belt.

Vandry’s next quarterly seminar is planned for September.

Doctor’s health concerns about themselves and patients

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I am an advocate of many things, including making a difference with a person’s health.  I have met many types of people including good, bad, ugly, sociopathic, psychopathic, and so on.

My research foundation named the Vandry Hope Foundation was founded by my wife and I for a reason.  www.vandryhhope.org

I have been an athlete my entire life, and I have seen injuries, pain, and chronic diseases.  My wife and I work with the handicapped.  I specialize with the legally blind, and find research to avoid blindness or control it.  For example, there was a case regarding Macular Degeneration, and eye disease.

Opthalmologist Dr. Ronald Pugh on discussed Macular degeneration and how 27 of his patients reversed legal blindness and went back to 20/20 with supplements and minerals.  Here is a youtube clip of Dr. Pugh discussing blindness and nutrition.1

TBI or Traumatic brain injury can be debilitating in so many ways, and along with treatments.

PTSD is a variety of alpha bet soup conditions.  PTSD is not a disease like cancer.  It is an emotional trauma or physical trauma that affects the way you perceive, think and react.  It could be losing a job, a divorce, or something on a higher level such as losing a limb in a war, or witnessing an emotional damaging event.

These days, we have civilians and veterans seek medical care.  We all know the glowing reviews on VA and the waiting line they help our vets with.

I get contacted weekly from people across USA that either read about our research, or a friend referred them, or a facebook email.  I do not prescribe medicine, nor do I give medical opinions.  However, there are references to toxicity of pharmaceuticals, correct nutrition, detoxification and much more that many do not know.  One of the first points when I get contacted by a person with pain, or depression, lupus or whatever their condition is, they usually have a doctor that gave up on them.

Sometimes just support can be healing.

Medical doctor’s microscoped

Here is a frightening list of exactly who takes care of us in medicine.  Here we go:

1. Dr. Joan Anzia, a psychiatry professor at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine on doctor suicide:

“Doctors are more likely than the general population to commit suicide, with an estimated 350 to 400 physicians killing themselves in the U.S. each year.”

2. Burnout rate among doctors growing over 3 years, study shows.  Analyzing the results of 2011 and 2014 surveys of more than 6,000 doctors across the United States, researchers found that the number who met the criteria for burnout rose from 45 percent to 54 percent over that time.  Research has shown that doctor burnout can lead to poor patient care, higher doctor turnover and a decrease in the overall quality of the health care system.2

3. Doctors look for ways to prevent suicide.  A 2015 study in the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that 29 percent of resident physicians have depressive symptoms.3

4. Why are doctors plagued by depression and suicide?  A crisis comes into focus.  More than 62,000 people — many of them medical professionals and their families — signed a petition  calling on medical associations to track physician suicides, provide confidential counseling, and require doctor training programs to address a “culture of abuse” too often characterized by bullying, harassment, and humiliation.  A study published in Academic Medicine finds that 35 percent of medical residents — young doctors recently out of medical school — experience clinically significant depression.4

5. Medical errors now third leading cause of death in United States.  BMJ shows that “medical errors” in hospitals and other health-care facilities are incredibly common and may now be the third-leading cause of death in the United States — claiming 251,000 lives every year, more than respiratory disease, accidents, stroke and Alzheimer’s.  Martin Makary, a professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who led the research, said in an interview that the category includes everything from bad doctors to more systemic issues such as communication breakdowns when patients are handed off from one department to another.

“It boils down to people dying from the care that they receive rather than the disease for which they are seeking care,” Makary said.5

6. In 1999, an Institute of Medicine report calling preventable medical errors an “epidemic” shocked the medical establishment and led to significant debate about what could be done.

Let me get this right on our confidence with the healthcare:

– 350 to 400 physicians killing themselves in the U.S. each year

– A three year research showed 45 to 54 percent of Medical Doctors have burnout

– 29 percent of resident physicians have depressive symptoms

– Medical errors now third leading cause of death in United States

– A 2005 essay published in JAMA found that male doctors killed themselves at a rate 70 percent higher than other professionals; among female doctors, that rate ranged from 250 to 400 percent higher.

– Doctors are prone to drug and alcohol abuse. It’s estimated that rates of addiction among the general population run from 8% to 10%; among physicians, the rates start at 10% and rise to 15%.6

– As many as one-sixth of primary care doctors leave medicine mid-career.6

So roughly, it shows on a study about 50% of Medical Doctors have burnout, 29% have depressive symptoms, an 15% have drug or alcohol abuse.  Doesn’t that total 94% have conditions that make you leery of relying on their prescriptions?  And lets add 400 MD suicides each year, and the last one–MEDICAL ERRORS ARE THIRD LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH IN USA!

There are good, overworked, stressed doctors.  I know some great Chiropractors, MDs, Surgeons, Neurologists that deserve a million dollars each.  And there are sociopathic terrible ones.  Bedside manner is a primary concern for the health profession.

Doctors, did you forget  DO NO HARM?

The well-known phrase “first, do no harm” comes from The History of Epidemics, which is part of the Hippocratic corpus:

“…But in those cases in which there was no danger, and where a concoction was made in proper time, it should be considered whether the translations of humours were good or critical signs.  Concoctions always portend a crisis, and safety from the disease; but crudities, or inconcoctions are soon converted into bad translations, or a defect or want of crisis, or pain, or a duration of the disease, or death, or a relapse. What will happen from these should be considered from other circumstances, as to know what is past, to discern what is present, and to predict the future.  And these two things in disease are particularly to be attended to, to do good, and not to do harm.  The whole art of medicine may be circumscribed in three distinctions, medicine, the sick-man, and the physician who is the minister of the art; and the conflict lies between the sick-person, the physician, and the disease.”

For all veterans or civilians, there are answers.  For those who do not believe the opioid crisis can be beaten, please look at a documentary my wife and I did with veterans pain using a product we created for pain relief years ago.

There is nutrition that corrects illnesses in many cases.  Many doctors do not want to listen to results.  I cannot state how many times veterans or civilians told me about their joint pain or especially hip pain, and then they explained to me how they had hip surgery yet they feel worse.

I remember a chiropractor years ago that had two hip surgeries, and he lectured to me that it was genetic.  I corrected him that it was not a genetic issue unless he had a condition he was born with.  I then sent him these facts:

1. 2012 in The Lancet, researchers used data from the National Joint Registry of England and Wales – the world’s largest joint replacement registry – to track more than 400,000 patients who underwent primary hip replacement from 2003 to 2011.  Of these, 31,171 received metal-on-metal implants – hips with a ball and cup made of a cobalt and chromium alloy.  After five years, 6.2 percent of metal-on-metal hips had failed.

2. February 29, 2012, Metals from hip replacements present toxic risk for millions, investigation warns British Medical Journal and BBC Newsnight investigation. (British Medical Journal and BBC Newsnight investigation)

So why am I mentioning hip surgery in this article?  Because it has to do with a common factor regarding nutrition.  Do you know what causes 94% of all hip surgeries?

Osteoarthritis is the primary indication for 94% of total hip arthroplasties.7

What is Osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis is a degeneration of cartilage or a protein of collagen in your joints.  Simple improvement in collagen II in diet worked well in a Harvard study on Rheumatoid arthritis.8

By the way, the chiropractor had no answer fir the above data, his only response was his mother just had hip surgery so it must be genetic.  My response was if family generations all smoke, than they too could claim lung cancer runs in the family.  I added to him if his theory were true, why did she have it after his, and not 30 years ago?

There are good doctors, and I am currently starting a list to refer to on our vandryhope.org website.  We have some on there currently.  If you suffer from chronic pain or other issues, and if you are looking for solutions, I must state that you are the source of overcoming.  Feel free to email me on facebook.  If you are a medical doctor, and have chronic pain or other conditions, please contact me via email and you have my support.

There are many people that have consulted with me on nutrition.  Yet the answers have to be within your power, not relying on a pharmacy or an MD that ignores your tests or doesn’t discuss them with you.  If you have a good doctor, keep him or her for life!  I have an average if 5-20 veterans each week I consult.  I had one who had Osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, duabetes, high blood pressure, insomnia, anxiety, depression, PTSD among others.

He had no answers and VA or medicine did not either.  I told Him I would walk with him, and show him the road but he has to be the one to walk the walk.  He has, and is a different man than just a month ago.  And for every Case like this, I receive 100 others who do nothing, have no motivation or simply feel I am going to do everything for them.  I cannot help those, only those who get up.  If you can’t get up, I will pick you up, but you have to fight with the spiritual and mental weapons to overcome and empower yourself.

My wife when she lectures on her seminars she always makes a point to the audience.  She states heart disease and cancer and other diseases are terrible, but there is one worse than all diseases combined.  It is called laziness.  And this is not directed to everyone with a chronic condition, but to those who have answers and do absolutely nothing.  This disease is incurable.  Sadly, I remember many cases like this.  For example, last year a veteran that stated he could not sleep, had pain so bad and at times had to sit in a wheelchair asked me for help.  I fedexed him ($60) our Miracle oil product (did not charge him) and got it to him overnight.  When we spoke on the phone for three hours he asked me for help.  Guess what?  I never heard from him again, but I saw him on facebook complaining about VA benefits.  See how sad this can be?

Our motto at Vandry hope is ‘Empowering through knowledge’, and we believe in that.  Many times my wife and I receive thanks and hugs for reaching and simply being there, but as Jesus stated to the blind man in the Bible Mark 10:46-52:

51 “What do you want me to do for you?” Jesus asked him.  The blind man said, “Rabbi, I want to see.”

52 “Go,” said Jesus, “your faith has healed you.” Immediately he received his sight and followed Jesus along the road.

For all you good MD’s out there, we need you badly.  Our veterans are dying each day, and our civilians need you too.  But we need you healthy, and not overstressed and overworked.

William Vandry

President, Vandry Hope Foundation

Chronic pain – TBI – legal blindness – PTSD research

References:

1.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acIQUWR_qvc

2. http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/sc-doctor-burnout-health-1202-20151202-story.html

3. http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/sc-doctor-suicide-depression-health-0713-20160630-story.html

4. https://www.statnews.com/2016/07/21/depression-suicide-physicians/

5. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your health/wp/2016/05/03/researchers-medical-errors-now-third-leading-cause-of-death-in-united-states/?utm_term=.e169628c166a

6. http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-grinspoon-addicted-doctors-20160605-snap-story.html

7. Katz JN, Losina E, Barrett J, Phillips CB, Mahomed NN, Lew RA, Guadagnoli E, Harris WH, Poss R, Baron JA. Association between hospital and surgeon procedure volume and outcomes of total hip replacement in the United States medicare population. J Bone Joint Surg Am 2001; 83-A:1622-9.

7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12571867

8. “Effects of Oral Administration of Type II Collagen on Rheumatoid Arthritis” Study Performed by David E. Trentham, Roselynn A. Dynesius-Trentham, E. John Orav, Daniel Combitchi, Carlos Lorenzo, Kathryn Lea Sewell, David A. Hafler, and Howard L. Weiner

PTSD Awareness Day

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Starting in 2010, Congress named June 27th PTSD Awareness Day (S. Res. 455).  In 2014, the Senate designated the full month of June for National PTSD Awareness (S. Res. 481).  The purpose of PTSD Awareness Month is to encourage everyone to raise public awareness of PTSD and effective treatments. We can all help those affected by PTSD.1

So yesterday was PTSD awareness day.  I am an advocate for veterans of any kind, and my wife Chandra and I have worked tirelessly with our military veterans.  Regarding PTSD, along with many fund raising groups, non profits, or some that discuss PTSD, the word ‘public awareness’ seems to be a buzz word for raising money.  That’s great, so what’s next?

PTSD treatments and rates of success

The Mayo clinic states Post-traumatic stress disorder treatment can help you regain a sense of control over your life.  The primary treatment is psychotherapy, but can also include medication.  Here are Mayo clinic solutions for PTSD:

Psychotherapy

Several types of psychotherapy, also called talk therapy, may be used to treat children and adults with PTSD.  Some types of psychotherapy used in PTSD treatment include:

  • Cognitive therapy.  This type of talk therapy helps you recognize the ways of thinking (cognitive patterns) that are keeping you stuck.
  • Exposure therapy.  This behavioral therapy helps you safely face both situations and memories that you find frightening so that you can learn to cope with them effectively.
  • Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). EMDR combines exposure therapy with a series of guided eye movements that help you process traumatic memories and change how you react to them.

Medications

  • Antidepressants.  These medications can help symptoms of depression and anxiety. They can also help improve sleep problems and concentration.  The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications sertraline (Zoloft) and paroxetine (Paxil) are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for PTSD treatment.
  • Anti-anxiety medications.  These drugs can relieve severe anxiety and related problems.  Some anti-anxiety medications have the potential for abuse, so they are generally used only for a short time.
  • Prazosin.  If symptoms include insomnia with recurrent nightmares, a drug called prazosin (Minipress) may help. Although not specifically FDA approved for PTSD treatment, prazosin may reduce or suppress nightmares in many people with PTSD.2

The Link between PTSD and Substance Abuse/Addiction

People who suffer from PTSD are between two and four times more likely to also battle addiction than their peers who do not also struggle with PTSD, the journal Clinical Psychology publishes.

Correlation between Stress, Drug Use, and Addiction

Substance abuse, addiction, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have a complex relationship that can complicate treatment modalities.  High levels of stress can make it more likely for a person to turn to drugs or alcohol as a means of escape.  Drugs can increase pleasure, decrease anxiety, and provide a distraction from difficult emotions.

When someone feels stressed, levels of GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) are lowered, and adrenaline is increased.  GABA is a kind of natural tranquilizer produced by the brain that can also be stimulated by drugs that suppress the central nervous system, like opioids, marijuana, alcohol, and benzodiazepines. Drugs also increase the presence of dopamine in the brain, one of the brain’s chemical messengers that tells a person to feel happy.  When the substances wear off, low moods are common as dopamine levels drop.3

How common is co-occurring PTSD and SUD in Veterans?

Studies show that there is a strong relationship between PTSD and SUD, in both civilian and military populations, as well as for both men and women.

Specific to Veterans from 2016:

  • More than 2 of 10 Veterans with PTSD also have SUD.
  • War Veterans with PTSD and alcohol problems tend to be binge drinkers. Binges may be in response to bad memories of combat trauma.
  • Almost 1 out of every 3 Veterans seeking treatment for SUD also has PTSD.
  • The number of Veterans who smoke (nicotine) is almost double for those with PTSD (about 6 of 10) versus those without a PTSD diagnosis (3 of 10).
  • In the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, about 1 in 10 returning soldiers seen in VA have a problem with alcohol or other drugs.4

VA suicide rates

According to the VA, an average of 20 veterans died from suicide every day in 2014.

The VA examined over 55 million veteran records from 1979 to 2014 from every state in the nation.  The last time the VA conducted a study like this was in 2010, but that report included data from only 20 states.

In 2014, 7,403 American veterans committed suicide, out of 41,425 suicides among U.S. adults that year. That’s just under 18 percent, down from 22 percent in 2010.

Today’s report also included comparisons between civilians and veterans.  From 2001 to 2014, the VA found, suicides among U.S. adult civilians increased 23 percent while veteran suicides increased 32 percent — making the risk of suicide 21 percent greater for veterans than civilians (after controlling for age and gender).

Older veterans face a higher risk of suicide, the data showed.  In 2014 about 65 percent of veterans who died from suicide were 50 years or older.5

Something to consider

So we have an alarming rate of suicides with veterans and I believe Army is highest.  Looking at the top solutions for our Veterans, what do we have from above?

Psychotherapy

In 2015 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, reveals that go-to treatments for the disorder may not be as effective as many in the medical community may have believed or hoped. The research showed that while up to 70% of the men and women who received CPT or PE experienced symptom improvements, around two-thirds of people receiving the treatments still met the criteria for a PTSD diagnosis after treatment. 6

Medications

Here is a good one.  Let’s look at the success of medications with veterans and PTSD.

18 U.S. veterans commit suicide daily; largely due to psychiatric drugs.7

Treatment for PTSD may be killing veterans.8

There needs to be more action taken for veterans.  For veterans themselves, our research foundation the Vandry Hope Foundation works on research and time on Chronic pain, TBI, Legal blindness and PTSD.  We have been through veterans and civilians to aid, help and make a difference.  I will also note, the above quotes on alcoholism and drugs must be taken into consideration.  For PTSD, it starts with your therapy, but ultimately, if you have a toxic lifestyle it makes it worse.  Start with putting yourself back together.  My wife and I have spent so many hundreds of hours with those with PTSD, or civilians with Chronic pain, anxiety and so many other conditions.  There are times we spend hours supporting those that seek us, and many times in the end, they themselves do nothing or go to other

In closing, I myself have worked with veterans, and many of you know of our Miracle oil product that relieves pain, and has worked excellent in results with veterans.  You can go to our youtube mini documentary on 7 veterans we worked on.  You can view it yourself:

References:

1.  https://www.ptsd.va.gov/about/ptsd-awareness/ptsd_awareness_month.asp

2.http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/post-traumatic-stress-disorder/diagnosis-treatment/treatment/ptc-20308558

3. http://americanaddictioncenters.org/ptsd/

4. https://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/problems/ptsd_substance_abuse_veterans.asp

5. http://abcnews.go.com/US/va-releases-results-largest-analysis-veteran-suicide-rates/story?id=40401007

6.http://time.com/3982440/ptsd-veterans/

7.https://www.cchrint.org/2011/06/04/18-u-s-veterans-commit-suicide-daily-largely-due-to-psychiatric-drugs/

8.http://warincontext.org/2010/08/31/treatment-for-ptsd-may-be-killing-veterans/

Prof. William Vandry teaches leglock seminar at RCJ Machado Farmers branch

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June 10, 2017

William and Chandra Vandry were hosted by Master Carlos Machado at RCJ Machado academy at Farmer’s branch location in Dallas, Texas.

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RN Chandra discusses chronic pain in her Got Pain? lecture

Chandra led with her annual Got pain? clinic, lecturing on chronic pain diseases, nutrition, insomnia and many other points regarding concerns for health.  Chandra discussed the St. Jude’s Miracle oilTM product she and William co-invented.  The Vandry’s also sampled the Miracle oil to many of the RCJ Machado students in chronic pain to 100% success in relief.

Prof. William Vandry taught his reputable leglock seminar, educating on basic setups to ankle locks, heelhooks and displayed counters or escapes to heelhooks.

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Master Carlos Machado and Prof. William Vandry

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Prof. Vandry teaching leglocks

 

 

William Vandry and boxing legend Leon Spinks for veterans

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Veterans Suicide Prevention Channel presents A Conversation With William Vandry “Alternatives to Opioids Series”

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Glenn Towery of Veterans Suicide Prevention Channel interviews William Vandry, Co-inventor of St. Judes Miracle Oil® essential oil product.  Glenn discussed nutrition, chronic pain, PTSD, and the work William and Chandra Vandry do with their non profit, the Vandry Hope Foundation, and work they do to inform the public more on Chronic pain, Legal blindness, PTSD, and poverty.

Miracle oil serves community at Austin Diagnostic Clinic Health Fair

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William Vandry with new friend and consumer

Vandry hope foundation attended the Austin Diagnostic clinic fair at the North Medical Center.  We brought the Miracle oil product, and our Vandry BJJ academy.  We were able to sample the Miracle oil product with these consumers:

Consumer 1, Elaine

11:34AM, Elaine has arthritis in her knees, and can only squat about an inch.  We applied the oil, and at 11:39AM, Elaine was smiling, feeling better and able to do a full rock bottom squat.  I then asked her to stand up on one leg, one at a time.  I then had her doing jumping jacks, and playing boxing drills to show her mobility and relief of pain.  Elena said she tried cortisone shots, and tried everything before.

Consumer 2, Barbara

12:04PM, Barbara has bad arthritis in both knees, and she cannot grip very well.  I have her test a coconut water bottle, which she cannot squeeze.  She has pain.  Two minutes later, Elaine had pain relief, and squeezes the coconut water bottle, then grabs her friends hand, then grabs the table no pain.

Consumer 3, Ginger

12:50 Ginger stated she has arthritis.  We applied to hand, and she felt relief within a minute, and states her arthritis “Is gone!”

Consumer 4,

12:32PM, she has chronic arthritis, and her arthritis is in the knee due to knee surgery on both knees.  We apply the oil and 12:37PM she walks without her cane.

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You can go to our Vandry Hope website at www.vandryhope.org, and for more information on St. Jude’s Miracle oilTM product, go to www.stjudesmiracleoil.com.  In addition, you can also go to our facebook pages

https://www.facebook.com/Vandry-Brazilian-Jiu-Jitsu-120961547918783/

https://www.facebook.com/vandryhope/

And to view video of our consumers, you can go to Miracle oil at facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/132501736829734/

Overcoming disabilities

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Professor William Vandry with autistic student Kaleb

I wrote this article for a variety of reasons.  I have worked with the disabled for many years.  I understand overcoming disabilities myself.  I have taught Martial arts to adults and children with disabilities such as:

  • Down syndrome
  • Autism
  • ADHD or ADD
  • Legally blind
  • MS
  • Cerebral Palsy

And of course many others such as cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, etc., but I wanted to focus more on disabilities here due to birth defects or trauma.

I have an autistic child in my children’s Jiu-jitsu class (Actually I have two).  His father spoke to me about him and his autism, and we both discussed his improvement from day one.  He was very antisocial at first, which is very common with children with autism and other types such as Autism Spectrum Disorder.   According to the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (5thedition), “Autism Spectrum Disorders” are characterized by “impairments in communication and social interaction,” by deficits in “social-emotional reciprocity,” and by “restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities.”  The DSM notes, “Only a minority of individuals with autism spectrum disorder live and work independently in adulthood.”

I believe many disabilities can be overcome, and all can be overcome in different ways.  My student Kaleb’s mother posted on facebook about disabled children that get rejected or mocked:

“It would be great to teach our children to be kind and to accept all their classmates.  Kids with special needs want what every kid wants: to be accepted!  And they suffer greatly when they are rejected or mocked.”

My student Kaleb did a video about Autism, and he made a point I believe was referring to respecting people, although these were his words:

“Now you know about autism, so be nice and care show care for people with autism.”

I see this all the time.  I have worked with the legally blind, and I sit and talk to each of them and their challenges.  I have had blind children at my clinics break down and cry about bullying or mocked by so many in schools, or neighborhoods.  This is appalling to me.  And I label it right there with cowardice, and moreso the person’s own low self esteem from what they endured from their own childhood or their own parents.

I have always taken the time to talk to any of my students that needed to talk to someone.  Children endure bullying and mockery, but many adults do at work, or community areas as well.  Although only 10 U.S. studies have been conducted on the connection between bullying and developmental disabilities, all of these studies found that children with disabilities were two to three times more likely to be bullied than their non-disabled peers.1

I remember my first class I taught to the legally blind.  I had a 20 year old woman who was totally blind from birth.  She disrupted every moment of the adult self defense class for the blind.  I reprimanded her, and it was very embarassing for her.  Since I was invited to this non profit for the blind, I didn’t charge a cent and paid for my own transportation there, this was on my time and dime.  She ended up being the best student at the class.  Why?  For one, that was obviously the first time someone treated her like an adult and not a handicapped person.  I remember her hugging me after.  Disabilities are challenges, but sometimes there are people who have disabilities you cannot cure.

There is a 1968 Braille Monitor for the legally blind that discussed discrimination and hostility:

“From the beginnings of recorded history the blind have been the victims of unreasonable and detrimental classification.  Today these discriminations are being recognized for what they are, and the blind and their friends are insisting with growing success upon justice and equal treatment.  No matter how moderately it may be done this resistance to discrimination will inevitably bring a certain amount of hostility.”2

I hate bullies.  I despise them so much.  Children are not the source of bullies.  Bullies learn from bullying parents or relatives.  Here are instances of bullying disabled statistics:

  • 2011 An 11-year-old boy with muscular dystrophy committed suicide by suffocating himself months after being bullied and robbed of an iPhone.  Mitchell Wilson, of Pickering in Ontario, Canada, was out walking when his face and teeth were smashed into the pavement by a boy from his school.  A 12-year-old was arrested and removed from the school, but Mitchell’s father said his disabled boy was ‘never the same’ after the attack.3
  • A teen with learning disabilities and “a heart too big for this world” committed suicide after he suffered two years of persistent bullying, according to a lawsuit against his school district.4

Self defense with women

I have also worked with women, and I have had women students who have been molested, raped, assaulted, and I remember having a special women’s class for them.  All of them ended up training with men in the regular classes, which was my graduating goal for all of them.  It took me three years, but I did it.  I still teach women’s self defense clinics during the year:

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Photo: Vandry BJJ women’s MMA/self defense clinic

I work with the legally blind, and my goal is to graduate them to overcoming bullies, society, financial dependency and eventually becoming an independent person.

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Photo: My wife Chandra and teaching blind students at TSBVI

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Photo: 2016 Chandra working with blind student

My wife and I also work with Military Veterans, PTSD, disabled and blind.  If any of them just need to talk, we are always there if they need us.  Same for the disabled.  There are worse handicaps.  I know there are people that mock, attack, belittle, disrespect and many other low self esteem expressions via actions by people.

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Photo: 2014 William and Chandra lecture to Blind Veterans association, San Antonio

In Martial arts schools, there are good students and bad ones.  The bad ones you try to work with, but eventually you will either excuse them or they usually they are not the alpha male and this napoleon complex is usually the destiny of their life.  I remember a past student of mine that I expelled from my school years ago.  I was told that this person made a statement about handicapped people by stating if  someone was retarded, they’re still retarded.  I think a person like that has more disabilities than a handicapped diagnosis.  Or those that bully the handicapped, such as schools, and work environments.  I have a friend who used to be a programmer at Dell, and he started losing his sight years ago due to glaucoma.  When he walked by with his cane, he used to tell me rude fellow employees came up to him and would ask: “Are you blind, or not blind?”  This was a man in his 40’s.  Most disabled children endure way worse, but like I said, the real disability is the ignorant of those who mock them.  If you have an autistic child, or disabled child, or you are a disabled adult, contact me.  You can find me on facebook.   https://www.facebook.com/william.vandry

I would like you to come by my academy and see disabilities do not matter, I know personally you can develop potential over disabilities.

Happy Easter,

Prof. William Vandry

References:

1. Disabilities: Insights from Across Fields and Around the World; Marshall, Kendall, Banks & Gover (Eds.), 2009 )

2. June, 1968 issue of the Braille Monitor

3. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2043480/Disabled-Mitchell-Wilson-11-commits-suicide-thug-punched-iPhone.html

4. http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/montana-teen-bullying-victim-committed-suicide-article-1.2545931

William and Chandra helping veterans with chronic pain

Professor Vandry's View Comments Off on William and Chandra helping veterans with chronic pain

https://youtu.be/vO99S2AqH1k

Jiu-jitsu and nutrition for self defense and health

Professor Vandry's View Comments Off on Jiu-jitsu and nutrition for self defense and health

 

vandryhopeblind37

What is Jiu-jitsu for?  There are a number of reasons, but let’s go through a few:

1. Self defense

Martial arts first and primary goal is to learn how to defend yourself.  It is not for competition, or even fitness, although those are goals on a secondary level.  You have to learn how to deal with stronger opponents, or those that can possibly bully or pick on children.  Most parents bring children for something of an outlet.  Usually this can be a parent that wants his or her child to be less introverted.  I have worked with children with Autism, Asperger syndrome (AS), also known as Asperger’s, is a developmental disorder characterized by significant difficulties in social interaction and nonverbal communication, along with restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior and interests.1  As a milder autism spectrum disorder (ASD), it differs from other ASDs by relatively normal language and intelligence.2

I have been very successful with those children, and working around those conditions.  My top children’s coach has worked with autistic children as well.  I have also worked with legally blind children at my academy, and one did well in a competition of BJJ years ago.  My wife and I work with the legally blind year around, and we do projects for the Texas School of the Blind, and have worked with the Blind Veterans Association.3

For average students, most also want some type of self defense course.  Despite what some schools promote training 7 days a week, or competition is their main promotion, they miss the point.  Most students do not compete unless it is a small club or group.  Some may compete once in a while, but the goal is not to force students to compete as a primary goal of their learning.  For my students that do compete, if they are children I emphasize their school grades first, and although rare, school instructor’s should pay attention to a parent’s goal with their child.

Children’s parents are usually attentive to watch classes, or attend ranking ceremonies.  They are very supportive to their children.  I have experienced in the past parents looking for schools to enroll their child that can be quite the opposite.

Here are two experiences I had that show different types of parents.  One was a Father who moved in from the Dallas area, and his child was about 12.  I change into my gi to teach the kid’s class.  I come out of my changing room and there is a child I do not know in a gi sitting on my mat.  I asked him could I help him.  He shrugged his shoulders.  I walked into the lobby and it was a parent there.  I asked him could I help him, and he told me he wanted his son to try my class.  He said his son had trained a year, and was the most talented child in the world.  Usually parents call or make appointments through email when bringing a child or if an adult plans to attend or try a class.

I was right about to start, so I explained to him waivers for a class, brief rules.  He had no problem, and kept expressing how great his child was.

When we did the class, I had three children that trained with him.  All of them were very nice, didn’t go hard on him, but tapped him in a gentle way.  They were all his age as well.

At the end of the class, the child told me how impressed he was by the students, especially the two girls.  When I walked into the lobby, I began to speak to the Dad.  He then seemed eager to leave.  He stated that he wanted to talk to his son and get back to me.  I asked his son in front of him how did he like my BJJ class?  His son replied: “Wow, I have never seen this before, and those girls I don’t know what chokes they did..”

I then looked at the Dad, and stated: “Well, I think you heard it yourself, it looks like he has a desire to learn.”

The Dad replied by telling me he wants his son to be a world champion.  He then told me he has two other sons.  What he told me next summarized his entire goals in BJJ for his son.  He replied, and this is pretty much verbatim:

“Well…my goal one day is to have all three of my sons fight in the UFC…”

He then said he needed to leave, grabbed his son and left.

This is an issue with those types of parents.  Those children may in fact never learn, or develop their self defense skills because of the living vicariously through the child parent.

I have on the other hand some great parents.  One of our students and kickboxing students has two children.  He and his wife like many other parents in my kids class are very supportive, and are there at promotions, or even in tournaments.  I note when his children compete, they are very talented, but there is no pressure from him or like the parent above.  Children have to develop and grow, as I have some students in their twenties that used to be in my kids class.

Some adults may have this same persona.  I have discussed many times other school’s students asking to attend my classes, and asking for open mat days, but I refer them back to their instructor.  I think any type of solicitation may be of different factors.  If a student no longer trains at a school, then I am glad to speak with him, but never, and never should any BJJ instructor take a student from another school simply to make money or care less about his respect for other schools.

Women develop self defense and that is their primary goal at first.  We had one woman who was very shy and polite, that attended kickboxing classes at our school.  She contacted me months ago, and was frightened and excited that she defended herself against a male adult.  It was remote control for her, and a good snap kick to the person’s chest backed them off.  Good for her!

2.  Health

I have had overweight children, and adults start at my school.  My wife and I research and lecture on nutrition.  We believe in maintaining health with students.  We teach at our Got pain? clinics each year regarding nutrition, inflammation, diet, and rest.  If you have blood pressure issues, or arthritis, it can be very difficult to train with inflammation or pain.  Those you can overcome with proper training, warmups and of course learning nutrition.  I have many articles you can refer to such as some on joints and pain.4

I have had some overweight students in the 300+ range and one in the 440lb area. Children have more diabetes, and obesity and the parents do too.  I have worked with two good students who have literally changed their health.  Here is one I changed his diet, correct nutrition, and you can clearly see a huge difference in less than six months:

article3  article

275lbs.                                                   233lbs.

Here is a second student, about 440lbs. and down to around 300 in less than six months:

photo  photo2

 

 

Obesity and blood pressure relate with diabetes, heart disease and other conditions.  For more information on health articles, you can read about disk disease, diabetes and more.5

3. Nutrition

Nutrition is not an option.  When we have essential vitamins and minerals, remember what essential means.  You don’t have a choice.  Both of the students above had arthritis, and one had a knee that kept popping out of joint.  He doesn’t have those problems anymore, but a key component whether just for self defense, competition or fitness there is another  primary point.  If you don’t add nutrition, you will degenerate more.  A primary diet of correct mineral and vitamins along with enzymes and detoxification are paramount in today’s plague of illness, heart disease, diabetes, cancer and more.  As a student, you have to remember calcium and magnesium flex and relax muscles, along with keeping the neurological system maintained.  If minerals are depleted, you can develop other forms of osteoarthritis, osteoporosis and others.  Read other health articles for more information referencing the Pubmed medical journals.4

Keep training, and if you are a potential student looking for self defense, fitness, health or related areas, please give us a call or stop by the academy.  512-585-1289.

Professor William Vandry

References:

1. National Institute of Mental Health. September 2015. Retrieved 12 March 2016.

2. World Health Organization. 2015. Retrieved13 March 2016.

3. http://vandryhope.org/blindness/

4.http://www.williamvandry.com/category/pain-nutrition/

5.http://www.williamvandry.com/2014/04/25/obesity-diabetes-minerals-lumbar-disc-disease-collagen-ii-coconut-oil-and-the-vandry-racehorse-theory/

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